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Largest US refinery restarts production after Harvey shutdown

Largest US refinery restarts production after Harvey shutdown

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America’s biggest oil refinery, the Motiva Enterprises facility at Port Arthur in Texas, restarted production on Monday after being shut since August 30 because of flooding from Hurricane Harvey, according to Reuters.

The facility, which can produce 603,000 bpd at full capacity, was starting easy at lower output levels and will take four-to-eight weeks to regain maximum production.

Elsewhere in Texas, the US Coast Guard (USCG) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continued working with state regulators on the clean-up of oil and chemical spills from dozens of installations, including several refineries.

Oil refineries, fuel terminals, storage tanks and other entities were variously compromised by damage resulting from Harvey’s fierce passage through the southeast of the Lone Star State.

The exact amount of liquid pollutants spilled and gases dispersed into the air during the calamitous storm and flooding, will probably never be known, experts say.

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Donal Scully

With 28 years experience writing and editing for newspapers in the UK and Hong Kong, Donal is now based in California from where he covers the Americas for Splash as well as ensuring the site is loaded through the Western Hemisphere timezone.

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