LPG-fuelled engines gaining traction

LPG-fuelled engines gaining traction

MAN Diesel & Turbo has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Hyundai Heavy Industries Engine & Machinery Division (HHI-EMD) regarding the development and production of MAN B&W ME-LGIP dual-fuel engines. Upon completion, HHI-EMD will be able to deliver liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) –fuelled, two-stroke-propulsion engines.

Bjarne Foldager, a vice president at MAN Diesel & Turbo, said: “MAN Diesel & Turbo has previously experienced strong market interest in using LPG as a fuel aboard LPG carriers, but other shipping segments have also begun investigating this option, a general tendency that is growing.”

He added: “LPG holds great potential as a fuel since it contains no sulphur, is widely available, and easy to bunker. It is therefore becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to other, low-sulphur fuel types. We have a long tradition of technical cooperation with our licensees and we are looking forward to working with Hyundai on this exciting project.”

MAN Diesel & Turbo noted in a release: “LPG’s future as a viable fuel for marine transportation looks promising as it will not require as large an investment in infrastructure – such as bunkering facilities – in contrast to other, gaseous fuels. Accordingly, MAN Diesel & Turbo expects a strong demand for LGIP engines for very large gas carriers (VLGCs) and coastal vessels from their introduction.”

Last week the World LPG Association (WLPGA) issued a report on using the fuel in ships, something the association claims has as much potential as LNG as an alternative fuel of the future.

“LPG as a marine fuel is at least as attractive as LNG, already available almost everywhere, offering shorter payback periods, lower investment costs and less sensitivity to fuel price scenarios. LPG can be used in all sizes of vessels from the largest of ocean going ships, down to the smaller boats with inboard or outboard engines,” the report claimed.

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

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