AmericasBunkeringOffshoreRenewables

American firm presses ahead with tech creating hydrogen from seawater without any need for desalination

Baltimore-based sHYp has developed an electrolyser that produces hydrogen from seawater or brine without requiring desalination or producing toxic waste. The startup company, launched in 2019, has now entered into a business-development agreement with Green Swan Partners, a venture builder in Pittsburgh, to commercialise the technology.

Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will explore markets, verticals, applications and geographies to deploy sHYp’s technology commercially. Once they identify opportunities, they plan to form a joint venture to commercialise the technology on a global scale.

“Green Swan Partners … [has] a unique business model that enables them to build new value for our technology in markets we may not or are not able to pursue alone,” said Carl Fischer, CEO of sHYp. “This is extremely attractive to a startup and should help us build, scale and grow faster than we could on our own.”

Because the sHYp electrolyser operates without a membrane, can be 3D printed, does not require that input water be purified, is designed for modular generation at the point of use and produces no harmful by-products that must be disposed of, the technology is expected to be relatively inexpensive and more environmentally friendly compared with conventional electrolysis.

The technology will have a variety of business applications. In addition to producing hydrogen, the electrolysers will be able to produce valuable co-products, such as magnesium hydroxide and silica, capture CO2 from sea water, treat ballast water and harness surplus electricity generated by wind, solar and wave farms.

sHYp is on track for a first commercial pilot in Q4 this year.

Kim Biggar

Kim Biggar started writing in the supply chain sector in 2000, when she joined the Canadian Association of Supply Chain & Logistics Management. In 2004/2005, she was project manager for the Government of Canada-funded Canadian Logistics Skills Committee, which led to her 13-year role as communications manager of the Canadian Supply Chain Sector Council. A longtime freelance writer, Kim has contributed to publications including The Forwarder, 3PL Americas, The Shipper Advocate and Supply Chain Canada.

Comments

    1. Huh? Nothing even remotely like perpetual motion.
      Very close to being zero emission and using abundant natural resources with seemingly not too many harsh bi products. But Perpetual motion it is not.

  1. “akin to” = “somewhat analagous” …
    “Perpetual Motion Machine” = “too good to be true” aka “not possible” …
    – operates without a membrane
    – can be 3D printed
    – does not require that input water be purified
    – is designed for modular generation at the point of use
    – produces no harmful by-products that must be disposed of
    – relatively inexpensive = “We’d go so far as to say we’d give it away for free” – this from their website.
    – more environmentally friendly compared with conventional electrolysis
    In addition to producing hydrogen,
    – the electrolysers will be able to produce valuable co-products, such as
    – magnesium hydroxide
    – silica
    – capture CO2 from sea water
    – treat ballast water
    – harness surplus electricity generated by wind, solar and wave farms
    – turn water into wine???
    Of course I could be mistaken …

  2. To date a key problem in hydrogen electrolysis is the rapid degradation of the anode systems used. No mention in the article if this has been solved.

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