EuropeTech

Former Wärtsilä employees in Russia set up their own business 

Former Russian employees of Finnish marine technology firm Wärtsilä have established a new company after the latter halted its operations in the country.

The company called EMCT (Evolution of Marine Digital Technologies) was founded in St. Petersburg in June by Andrey Sitkov and Vladimir Ponomarev, the former COO and general director of marine navigation solutions provider Transas in Russia, which was taken over by Wärtsilä in 2018. The business is reportedly backed by Russian financial partners and investors, who are also the majority owners.

EMCT is going to take on the tasks of expert and technical support for current Wärtsilä users, and look to develop and bring to the market domestic software and hardware solutions that can replace Wärtsilä  products,” Russia’s RBC said, citing Ponomarev.

“The departure of Wärtsilä from Russia in March 2022 effectively deprived users of qualified expert support and the opportunity to develop software and hardware solutions to meet changing requirements and standards,” Ponomarev told RBC.

According to the publication, the Finnish company offered key Russian employees the opportunity to move abroad, but they decided to stay and build their own business, which is said to be looking to reach 40 to 50% of the turnover that Wärtsilä previously had in the Russian market within the next three or four years. EMTC is also considering moving its own software products to the international market, with priorities set on countries friendly to Russia.

Wärtsilä announced a complete halt to all operations in Russia in March, including the supply and sale of equipment, as well as the acceptance of new orders. This resulted in a €200m write-off in the first quarter of 2022.

Adis Ajdin

Adis is an experienced news reporter with a background in finance, media and education. He has written across the spectrum of offshore energy and ocean industries for many years and is a member of International Federation of Journalists. Previously he had written for Navingo media group titles including Offshore Energy, Subsea World News and Marine Energy.

Comments

  1. Shame on (Wart)-Silla

    Go woke & Go broke…

    Good for the entrepreneurial spirit of the founders in new company EMTC…

  2. Finns had been doing good business with Russians for decades until this year. Shipbuilding, engines, timber, transas, valio, hakka… and now gonna lost everything. For what? To be NATO cannon fodder in WW3?

    1. Well, in WW2 Finns proved they could grind Soviets to bits and pieces. And the war in Ukraine shows clearly that the ethnic Russians use their dirt-poor minorities as cannon fodder and single-use soldiers. Now, are you happy with that? No objections, really? Bombing civilian targets seems to be cool in your neighborhood? Hmm…

  3. Agree, in WW2 Finns were an ally of Nazi Germany and could grind Soviet civilians in Leningrad to bits and pieces. However, were unable to capture that heroic city. In 1944 they managed to turnover and avoid destruction by soviet army.
    Finland had been doing well with their neighbor until this WEF appointed white faced lady came in charge.

    1. You know nothing about WW2 in the European war theater, Mr. Captain S. Please Google out Winter war, will you? Broaden your horizons a tiny little bit. It’s Soviets who attacked Finland on 30 Nov 1939 and were repelled, despite their superior military strength, in exactly same way as it is going on now in Ukraine. Even the rationale for the war was similar – claiming Finnish land for “security reasons”, namely the protection of the city of Leningrad.

      List of European countries & territories attacked by Soviets & Russia since end of WW1:

      Lithuania 1918-1919 (defeat of Soviets)
      Poland 1919-1921 (defeat of Soviets)
      Poland 1939 (hand in hand with Nazis, do you know about that?)
      Finland 1939
      Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia 1940
      Romania 1940
      — > Germany attacked Soviets in 1941 <—
      East Germany – Berlin uprising 1953
      Hungarian Revolution 1956
      Czechoslovakia 1968
      Chechnya 1994
      Chechnya 1999
      Georgia 2008
      Ukraine 2014 till present

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