AsiaOperationsTankers

Indian product tanker makes history

Celebrating International Women’s Day, Shipping Corporation of India (SCI) debuted something remarkable over the weekend, a product tanker with an all female set of officers.

Mansukh Mandaviya, minister of state for ports, shipping and waterways was on hand on Saturday to virtually flag off the 73,655 dwt Swarna Krishna from Mumbai.

SCI has been a pioneer in employing women seafarers onboard its vessels and has implemented various initiatives to aspiring female cadets at its maritime training institute.

H K Joshi (pictured, centre), chairwoman of the state-run line, boarded the ship, prior to its departure, and discussed the growing “empowered womanhood” in local seafaring circles.

Last November the International Chamber of Shipping issued a 50-page report with some urgent recommendations for the industry to address its extraordinary diversity issues.

According to the International Transport Workers Federation’s recent collective bargaining agreements, the global supply of seafarers available for service on internationally trading ships is estimated at 1,647,500. Women seafarers comprised 1%. Once cruise shipping is included into this figure, the number of women working at sea stands at 7.5%.

Recommendations contained in the the ICS Diversity Tracker report include introducing flexible working patterns; ensuring suitable onboard accommodation for women seafarers; and publishing diversity and inclusion targets.

State-run SCI is due to be privatised later this year. One of the bids lodged comes from Exmar, GMS and Foresight. Foresight executives discussed with local newspaper Business Standard their plans to make SCI into an energy-focused shipowner, with big investments in LNG carriers.

“We want to transition SCI from a conventional shipping company to specifically energy tonnage. India energy demand is expected to grow double digit,” a Foresight executive said.

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

Comments

  1. I could make up a ships entire crew of red heads, left handers, vegans, dwarfs, Latin speakers, Hartlepool season ticket holders or people with webbed feet but that’s not the point. The point is….are they there because they are the best skilled officers or is it a massive display of diversity virtue signalling? If the latter, then this is patronizing attention seeking and insulting to women. Hope the cook is a woman too!

    1. Spot on Cpt Paper Work.
      NOW WE KNOW WHY MALE SEAFARERS 55+ ARE REMOVED FROM CIRCULATION.
      THE PROPAGANDA P.R. AND VIRTUE SIGNALLING IS MORE IMPORTANT THEN COMMON SENSE.
      AND YOU ASK ME TO LIKE AND SUPPORT WOMAN IN MARITIME ????????
      THIS ENABLING CONDITION/ENVIRONMENTS ARE CREATED TO LEAD FORCEFULLY ONE GROUP TO SUCCESS , WHILE THE OTHER IS FORCED TO MISERY AND OSTRACISM BY IT’S OWN MOTHER INDUSTRY .
      IT IS A CLEAR CASE OF AGE/MALE DISCRIMINATION TO BOOST WOMAN GLORIFICATION . IT COULD BE A STRANGE COINCIDENCE BUT MY SEVERAL JOB APPLICATIONS WERE REJECTED BY FEMALES IN THEIR 30’s WHOSE EXPERIENCE WITH SHIP OPS RELATED ONLY TO CREWING , HENCE PLS FORGIVE ME , THAT MY OPINION/VIEW ON THE ISSUE IS SURELY NOT OBJECTIVE 😉

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