India’s Karanja port project may be underway again

India’s Karanja port project may be underway again

It looks as though construction of India’s new Karanja port at Navi Mumbai is up and running again, after SKIL Ports & Logistics today confirmed its contractor’s workforce has been remobilised.

In April, the company reduced construction activity at the site from 24-hour work to 12-hour shifts “in order to resolve certain local community issues”.

Around 4 hectares of land have already been reclaimed in the project, and access roads have been developed to help heavy machinery on to the site. Work is expected to continue with reclamation and piling activities.

“In early Q3, which is predominantly the monsoon season, in addition to continued jetty construction activities, the contractors are scheduled to commence ground improvement works including laying pre-fabricated vertical band drains across the length and breadth of the reclaimed area followed by laying a 3-4 meter surcharge,” Nikhil Gandhi, executive chairman of SKIL Ports & Logistics, said in April.

“The ground improvement process will be followed by laying concrete paver blocks (interlocking concrete blocks) which will form the ultimate surface of the container and bulk cargo storage yards.”

SKIL’s board expects that reverting to round-the-clock construction will boost productivity by 60% to 70%.

The finished port will occupy around 200 acres, with a kilometre-long quay and planned links to India’s largest container port Jawaharlal Nehru and the existing Mumbai Port. Aside from containers, details of the port’s cargo mix and capacity have yet to emerge.

In 2010, SKIL Ports & Logistics raised £76m ($121m) on the London Stock Exchange to finance the Karanja facility.

 

Holly Birkett

Holly is Splash's Online Editor and correspondent for the UK and Mediterranean. She has been a maritime journalist since 2010, and has written for and edited several trade publications. She is currently studying for membership of the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers. In 2013, Holly won the Seahorse Club's Social Media Journalist of the Year award. She is currently based in London.

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