Maritime media stalwart Fairplay bows out at 135

Maritime media stalwart Fairplay bows out at 135

Fairplay, one of the oldest names in maritime media, is to cease publishing by the end of this year, according to multiple sources contacted by Splash.

Fairplay was founded by Thomas Hope Robinson in the UK in 1883 with a credo to “speak out, loud and bold … for the shipowner, as an advocate, not a judge”.

In its 135-year history it has had multiple owners, and is currently held by IHS Markit, which also publishes the Journal of Commerce.

Splash understands both the web title and the magazine will be folded with the last issue of Fairplay magazine due to print in the first week of December.

“I’m sad to see the killing of a publication to which so many staff, over 135 years, dedicated their labour and which spawned a Fairplay ‘family’,” commented Neil Wiese, a former managing editor of the British title.

Fairplay’s publisher has yet to reply to questions sent by Splash earlier today.

 

 

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

Related Posts

2 Comments

  1. Alan Knight
    September 27, 2018 at 7:17 pm

    “The captains and the kings depart,
    On dune and headland sinks the fire”.

    “Recessional”, Rudyard Kipling

    The end of “Fairplay” is a sad event for the shipping industry. My thanks to the writers who made it a “must read” throughout my 50 years in the marine industry.

  2. Barry Parker
    September 28, 2018 at 8:45 pm

    Where big corporate parents (read between the lines- “events” or “data” are the primary biz) take over organizations that are publishing maritime magazines, sadly- the old style print publications become highly vulnerable.