AsiaOperations

Rescued crewmember says livestock ship lost power in typhoon and capsized

One crewmember on the 2002-built livestock carrier Gulf Livestock 1 has been rescued by the Japan Coast Guard. Sareno Edvarodo, a 45-year-old chief officer from the Philippines, is the sole crewmember to have been found alive following the Panamanian-flagged ship’s sinking in the early hours of Wednesday morning off southern Japan. Another 42 crew are missing, as are 5,867 cattle.

Edvarodo, plucked from the sea after many hours in the East China Sea, related that the ship had encountered bad weather caused by Typhoon Maysak. Its engine failed and then a freak wave battered the converted former boxship and it capsized.

When the ship capsized, crew were instructed to put on lifejackets. Edvarodo said he jumped into the water and did not see any other crew before he was rescued.

The vessel – which was en route from New Zealand to China – is owned by UAE shipowner Gulf Navigation and prior to conversion in 2012 was a 630 teu boxship.

In May 2019, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority identified stability and navigation issues in the Gulf Livestock 1, delaying its departure on a journey from Broome to Indonesia.

New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has temporarily suspended consideration of cattle livestock export applications in the wake of the accident.

Veterinarian Dr Lynn Simpson worked on livestock carriers for many years. Coming ashore she penned a series of exposés on the trades for Splash, all accessible here.

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Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

Comments

    1. Responding to Your Sir, explicit manifestation of DOUBT, pls forgive me for borrowing a line from famous “save the planet” activist:
      HOW DARE YOU!!!!

  1. I heard capsizing of cattle carrier so many times that it is pushing me to believe that such ships are built to capsize, blazed, and kill precious life of humans and animals.

  2. Stability is an import issue here but so too is the reason for engine failure.
    Was this just an accident waiting to happen because of the engine’s condition and maintenance or could it have been caused by fuel problems. or something similar to what happened on Viking Sky last year?

  3. Does anyone know the approx time of the capsize? I wonder if it was the Chief Officer’s watch and as he was on the bridge and saw the disaster he had a chance to escape overboard. Everyone else in their cabins, maybe in the dark with no chance to escape.

  4. Another floating coffin 18 years of sea service.. In bad weather if main engine is dead and no steerage the ship will roll tremendously.. Bad for the stability of the vessel and it will capsize..

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