Ship spotters ready to take a look at the world’s largest boxship

Ship spotters ready to take a look at the world’s largest boxship

The world’s largest containership reduces fuel consumption and CO2 emissions per container moved by about 25 to 30% compared to 14,000 teu-class equivalents, its owner claimed today.

Japan’s Mitsui OSK Lines took delivery yesterday of the MOL Triumph, the world’s first 20,000 teu-class ship.

MOL’s newest vessel, the first of a fleet of six 20,170 teu ships MOL contracted Samsung Heavy Industries to build, will be the largest boxship afloat for a couple of months before a series of even larger OOCL vessels deliver from the same yard.

Junichiro Ikeda, president and CEO of MOL, said, “The MOL Group is honoured to unveil this new vessel, which is the largest containership in the world. The vessel is equipped with various new sustainable technologies to provide more efficient fuel consumption and improved environmental performance.”

Ship spotters in Asia and Europe will get a chance next month to see the world’s largest boxship. The giant, blue-hulled ship will be deployed on THE Alliance’s FE2 service.

MOL Triumph will set off on its maiden voyage from Xingang early next month and will sail to Dalian, Qingdao, Shanghai, Ningbo, Hong Kong, Yantian and Singapore. It will then transit through the Suez Canal and continue on to Tangier, Southampton, Hamburg, Rotterdam and Le Havre. She will then call at Tangier and Jebel Ali on the way back to Asia.

The MOL Triumph is 400 m long, some 19 m more than the Empire State Building is tall.

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

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1 Comment

  1. ha1ry
    March 28, 2017 at 3:32 pm

    They’re going to need fleet of feeders to operate that!