Statoil to build world’s first floating wind farm off Scotland

Statoil to build world’s first floating wind farm off Scotland

Statoil has made the final investment decision to build the world’s first floating wind farm: The Hywind pilot park offshore Peterhead in Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

The decision triggers investments of around NOK2bn ($235m).

Statoil will install a 30 MW wind turbine farm on floating structures at Buchan Deep, 25 km offshore Peterhead, to provide renewable energy to the Scottish mainland. The wind farm will power around 20,000 households. Production start is expected in late 2017.

“Statoil is proud to develop the world’s first floating wind farm. Our objective with the Hywind pilot park is to demonstrate the feasibility of future commercial, utility-scale floating wind farms. This will further increase the global market potential for offshore wind energy, contributing to realising our ambition of profitable growth in renewable energy and other low-carbon solutions,” said Irene Rummelhoff, Statoil’s executive vice president for new energy solutions.

The pilot park will cover around 4 sq km, at a water depth of 95-120 m. The average wind speed in this area of the North Sea is around 10 m per second.

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

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1 Comment

  1. Avatar
    Scottish Scientist
    November 3, 2015 at 10:57 pm

    Floating wind turbines are good.

    Next, relocate them to sunnier waters, add solar panels, store surplus energy in undersea hydrogen gas bags/ containers and that system can supply on-demand electricity via under-water long distance electrical power transmission lines.