Swap shop of shipping launches

Swap shop of shipping launches

The former head of United Arab Chemical Carriers (UACC) CEO Per Wistoft has returned to the industry with an exciting new platform that promises to revolutionise the trading of ships worldwide.

The Tonnage Exchange offers opportunities to swap tonnage on sale, sale/leaseback and charter party terms and is aimed at shipowners and operators, oil companies, traders, banks, private equity investors and shipyards.

“When considering your company’s asset position, you often find yourself restricted and unable to act because of for instance book values exceeding market values, assets not being suitably located geographically or your risk position limiting a desire to explore strategic changes. The Tonnage Exchange is a strategic management tool and platform for moving and optimising assets. It provides new ideas and alternative solutions on how to deal with these well known, but often complicated, business challenges,” commented founder Wistoft. The platform was co-founded by Michel Deleuran, a long term Maersk employee who also worked for Qatari owner Milaha in the past.

Asset registration is free of charge and the exchange does not broker the tonnage. After registering as a user, with subsequent registration of vessel availabilities and requirements, the platform reacts with swap suggestions. Banks and other financial institutions are also able to indicate the availability of sale/leaseback transactions.

Several maritime companies have committed to register tonnage availabilities and requirements from the outset.

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

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