Maersk Honam cut in two and will be shipped to Hyundai Heavy to be rebuilt

Maersk Honam cut in two and will be shipped to Hyundai Heavy to be rebuilt

The 15,262 teu Maersk Honam is expected to be back in service in the second half of this year following one of the most ambitious ship repair procedures seen in commercial shipping this century.

The giant ship suffered a massive fire in March last year in the Arabian Sea, which killed five crewmembers. The blaze was one of the most high profile casualties in 2018.

Maersk officials have now revealed to Splash how they intend to get the ship back trading again.

The vessel, which has been in Dubai since last April, has been cut in two at Drydocks World Dubai.

The sound, 228.5 m long section from midship to stern will be transported aboard the Cosco heavylift vessel Xin Guan Hua to its original builder, Hyundai Heavy Industries in South Korea, where it will be rebuilt. The heavylift vessel is expected to reach HHI’s yard in Ulsan in March.

The former forward section will be safely moored at Drydock World Dubai for continued removal of damaged containers and debris. Once cleaned, it will be recycled. Relevant recycling options in accordance with Maersk’s responsible ship recycling standard are currently being investigated and evaluated.

“The rebuilt vessel is expected to resume service again in the second half of 2019,” a spokesperson for Maersk told Splash.

 

 

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

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1 Comment

  1. Avatar
    J_Skrilla
    January 15, 2019 at 9:46 pm

    Let’s hope for the memory of the lives lost they consider changing the name of the vessel.