Greater ChinaTech

Greywing wins this year’s Captain’s Table pitch competition

Crew travel software specialist Greywing was crowned the winner of this year’s Captain’s Table, one of shipping’s best known pitch competitions. Greywing beat out four other finalists in the Hong Kong event, which was held with pitches made via Zoom with the show airing live on Splash. Judges praised the Singapore-based firm for its efforts to overcome the crew change crunch this year.

The Shark Tank-style maritime competition, now in its second year, saw entries from around the world. Finalists were selected last month and they then went on a bootcamp before presenting to six judges this afternoon in Hong Kong. The winner takes a $20,000 cash prize as well as a wide supporting ecosystem from a host of maritime companies.

Greywing tech integrates with Veson IMOS, Compas Cloud and proprietary crewing technology to fix flights for crew, connecting directly to port agents to eliminate email chatter and has proven itself this year to be one of the tech solutions in the ongoing crew repatriation saga.

“Greywing brings crew home. With a focus on real time problem solving and strong execution skills, they have managed to solve a real problem for the industry while gaining traction within a short period of time,” commented Su Yin Anand, one of the co-founders of the Captain’s Table.

Attendees and viewers of the show were also asked to vote – the results of the popular vote favouring remote surveillance company Forecastle Shipping.

Singaporean analytics firm Portcast was the winner of last year’s inaugural Captain’s Table challenge. 

Sam Chambers

Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.
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